How much is the state pension in Ireland

Are you curious about how the Irish state pension system works and how much you can expect to receive in your pension payments?

In this guide, we’ll give you an overview of the state pension in Ireland and explain how age, residency, and work history affect the amount of money you’ll receive.

How Much is the State Pension in Ireland?

The amount you can receive from the Irish State Pension depends on your age and the number of years you have of PRSI contributions.

If you have a full contribution record, you will receive a full pension payment in addition to any other payments or allowances that may be applicable.

People are often surprised to learn you DO NOT HAVE an automatic entitlement to the state pension. It is based on the number of PRSI contributions you have made over your working life.

Your total State Pension payment will depend on your individual circumstances. If you don’t have enough PRSI contributions, you may be eligible for a Non-Contributory State Pension, but this is means-tested. Your other retirement income may affect it.

Weekly payments can range anywhere from €101.20 per week for those with less than 14 yearly average PRSI contributions to €253.30 per week for those with over 48 yearly average PRSI contributions.

State Pension (Contributory) rates in 2022 for people who qualified on or after 1 September 2012.

 

Yearly average PRSI contributions Personal rate per week
48 or over €253.30
40-47 €248.30
30-39 €227.70
20-29 €215.70
15-19 €165.10
10-14 €101.20

OUR ADVICE

  • You need to check your PRSI contributions now.
  • If you are self-employed you may be missing PRSI contributions.
  • If you have moved jobs frequently you need to make sure all contributions have been counted.
  • If you have lived & worked outside Ireland you need to check how that will effect your State Pension.
  • You don’t want any surprises when you go to apply for your state pension at 66 years old.

Spousal Benefits Under the Retirement Pension Scheme

If your spouse does not have entitlement to a State Pension through their own PRSI contributions you may be able to get an increase to your State Pension payment.

This system exists primarily for those who spent their working lives as homemakers.

Spouses, civil partners, or cohabitants (a partner living with you) of those receiving the state pension can be entitled to an increase in their partner’s benefits usually known as an Increase for a Qualified Adult (IQA).

The amount of increase may depend on the other person’s age, level of income and economic circumstances.

As the IQA is part of the primary social welfare payment most recipients will have to meet all the necessary criteria before being awarded this additional sum.

Rates for a pension increase for a qualified adult for people who qualified on or after 1 September 2012. These rates are in addition to your personal rate per week.

 

Yearly average PRSI contributions Increase for a qualified adult (under 66) Increase for a qualified adult* (over 66)
48 or over €168.70 €227
40-47 €160.60 €215.70
30-39 €152.80 €204.50
20-29 €142.90 €192.50
15-19 €110 €147.40
10-14 €67 €91.30

Need Pension Help?

If you need any help understanding your pensions contact us now. We offer a no obligation initial call.

How To Apply For The State Pension

  1. To check your PRSI record you can request a copy of your contribution statement through MyWelfare.ie.
  2. You cannot apply for your State Pension online.
  3. You can get an application form from your local post office, Intreo Centre or Social Welfare Branch Office.
  4. You can also print the application forms from gov.ie.

When Should I Apply For State Pension

You should apply at least 3 months before you reach the age of 66.

If you have paid social insurance contributions you should apply at least 6 months before you reach the age of 66.

Understanding Your Taxation Obligations After Retirement
When you retire it is important to be aware of your taxation responsibilities as once you stop working, any income earned must be declared for tax purposes.

This generally applies to most pensions although some, such as the state pension, may be exempt from taxation.

Investment income and rental income must also be reported for tax purposes so it is important to understand what your obligations are in order to pay the correct amount of taxes.

Greenway Financial Advisors Limited is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland. Registered No. C168372

Debbie Cheevers

Debbie Cheevers

Qualified Financial Advisor

Debbie was born in Dublin and graduated from NCAD with a degree in Visual Communication. She brings a strong customer services background to Greenway.

Debbie qualified as APA in 2017 and a fully qualified financial advisor (QFA) in 2018.

She believes that product knowledge is key to helping customers make the right choices.